Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

    Three years ago I rescued a 1 year old (now 4) female Shetland Sheepdog, Mia. She's my joy, she follows me everywhere and absolutely adores me. The problem is that she's absolutely terrified of my mom. Mia was abused by the woman I bought her from, and the woman was about my moms height/build. Mia is generally much more shy around women (she's why of everyone) but even after three years in the same house seeing her everyday, she's still terrified of my mother. This wasn't a big issue until I got a job and am gone all day. My mom hates taking care of Mia (we do have another sheltie that loves my mom) when Mia runs away from her and is so frightened. So any suggestions with getting her over her fear? We've tried herbs and feed supplements to calm her, but they just made her sleepy. Help?
    Mia is not agressive at all. She has never tried to bite, she does't bark excssivley. She does tend to nervously run in circles, though. She gets plenty of exercise as I live in the country and have several acres.
    My mom does tend to yell a lot and walk heavy. Her walking makes a lot of noise which scares the dog. I don't think she's aware that she's yelling, I believe she has hearring problems.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

    a small little way to bring a dogs self esteem up is to pet the dog under the chin instead of on top of the head...petting on the head accerts your dominance

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

    does your mum yell alot or rush around alot becuse this will cause alot of problems with a fearfull dog, let your mum feed her daily and ask her to spend time sitting on the floor below her level, even laying on the floor with treats she likes and when she's ready she'll get closer, this will take some time but there should be no reason in the time a movie starts and finished a little trust could be established.. I think if after 3 years she still don't trust you mum, there is a reason for this, you mum's inpatience and annoyance is rubbing off, you cant help, only your mum can, sorry.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

    This is from Cesar Millan (The Dog Whisperer) website..."Nose, eyes, ears...in that order!
    I remind dog owners that dogs see the world differently from the way we do. We communicate using our ears first, then our eyes and lastly, our nose. Dogs begin with the nose, then the eyes, and lastly the ears. Allowing a dog to experience our scent before we engage it in eye contact or speak to it is one way to establish trust early on.

    When is the right time to share affection?
    After a dog has exercised and eaten. After a dog has changed his unwanted behavior into a behavior that you asked for. After a dog has responded to a rule or a command. If you dog jumps up on you demanding to be petted, it's probably your instinct to oblige her. This behavior sends her the signal that she is in charge. Share your affection to sit down and calm down. Then you share affection, on your terms. Your dog will quickly come to realize that there is only one correct behavior to get her the things she wants.

    When is the wrong time to give affection?
    When your dog is fearful, anxious, possessive, dominant, aggressive, whining, begging, barking---or breaking any rule of your household. Anytime you give affection, you reinforce the behavior that preceded it. You cannot "love" a dog out of her bad behavior, just as you can't "love" a criminal into stopping his crimes.

    Low Self-Esteem

    Self-esteem in a dog relates to energy, dominance, and submission. Dogs with low self-esteem are submissive, weak-energy, weak-minded dogs who may suffer from fears, panic, or phobias. They often exhibit anxiety. They may show fear-aggressive behavior or they may simply be terminally shy.

    Dogs with low self-esteem are desperately looking for a pack leader! They want to be told what to do--that?s sometimes the only time they?ll relax. The ?power of the pack? will help them get better faster--being around her own kind is powerful therapy for a dog with low self-esteem-but her time in the pack must be closely supervised at first because of all dogs? natural instinct for attacking weakness. Little by little, these dogs get better, but they need strong guidance from their human pack leader."

    The video shows how Cesar approaches a dog that is afraid of men, but is the same concept.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Shy Shetland Sheepdog, how to help her get over her fear?

    Your mom may be instigating the issue. By resenting taking care of the dog when the dog acts out, your mom is harboring negative emotion that the dog is picking up on. Try to initiate fun activities for your mom and your dog to participate in, such as a walk or fetch. Your dog needs to see that your mom is a positive experience, and your mom needs to be that positive experience. Your dog is not holding on to memories of any past experiences. Sure experiences do help shape animals, but your dog is more ready to move on than you are allowing her to. Don't pity her for her past experiences. Focus on the wonderful life your dog now has with you and how lucky she is to have found you.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Mateo CA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi, thanks for your very good advice! I have a shy shelti, only 10 months old and very very shy. The consultants I went to would agree with you, but they forgot to say to focus on the the wonderful like your dog now has. They did say not to reward shyness or fearfulnes. She loves walks and we take a lot. She doesn't mind being brushed or bathed! Not too shy around other small dogs. How I would love her to come out of the one room she chooses to remain in. She has not yet barked!
    But she is a sweet tempered dog, and a joy to walk.

Visitors found this page by searching for:

Nobody landed on this page from a search engine, yet!
SEO Blog

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44